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New CO2 carriers to have Norsepower rotor sails

Image: Northern Lights New CO2 carriers to have Norsepower rotor sails
Norwegian CO2 storage company, Northern Lights JV, is to install a Norsepower rotor sails on each of two new CO2 carriers under construction at Dalian Shipbuilding Industry Co. Ltd.

The LNG-powered 7,500 cu m vessels will each have one 28x4 m rotor sail installation, Northern Light has revealed, reducing fuel consumption and emissions by about 5%. The sails are due for delivery early next year and the ships themselves will be commissioned in 2024.  

Incorporating a range of other energy-saving technologies, the two 130m-long gas carriers will be deployed in collecting captured and liquefied CO2 from European entities and shipping it to Northern Lights’ receiving terminal in Øygarden, Norway, for intermediate storage. From there, the gas will be transported by pipeline for permanent storage in a reservoir 2,600 m under the North Sea.  

Norsepower CEO, Tuomas Riski, said: “As fuel prices increase and a carbon levy is initiated, getting newbuild vessels as efficient as possible is essential for long term commercial success. Northern Lights JV is setting a global standard for CO2 transportation by ships and highlights the importance of collaboration for accelerating the energy transition. Our technology, alongside an air lubrication system and other clean technologies will ensure operations are as low carbon as possible.”

Northern Lights JV, a joint venture between Equinor, Shell and TotalEnergies, claims to be the world’s first open-source CO2 transport and storage provider.

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